Healthy Never Tasted So Good Chew on This… Cuz That Ain't Right

May 3, 2013

Cilantro Pesto Recipe… Detox

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Cilantro Pesto Detox

Cilantro

Cilanto

This Cilantro Pesto is an excellent detox for pulling out the excess toxic minerals out of the body’s cells and eliminating them from the body all together.

Healthylicious!

It is easy to make and tastes great. 

Try it on sourdough toast, pasta, rice or a baked potato for just a few ideas.

Two teaspoons of this  pesto daily for three weeks is purportedly enough to increase the urinary excretion of mercury, lead, iron, copper and aluminum, thus effectively removing these toxic metals from your body.

Learn more about the importance of detoxing the hidden minerals that cause an excess of unwanted minerals leading to a decline in mental ability by reading, “How Petroleum Products Degenerate the Brain and Promote Cancer”.

I recommend using this recipe for detox  for three weeks at least once a year. the optimum time based on the peak season for cilantro is during the cool early spring or fall.

sourdough_with_cilantro_pesto

Sourdough with Cilantro Pesto

CILANTRO PESTO RECIPE

  • 4 cloves garlic (viral and bacterial)
  • 1/3 cup Brazil nuts (selenium)
  • 1/3 cup sunflower seeds (cysteine)
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin seeds (zinc, magnsium)
  • 2 cups packed fresh cilantro (detox)
  • 1/2 cup Italian parsley (detox)
  • 1/3 cup flaxseed oil (omega-3)
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil (omega-3)
  • 1/8 t turmeric (cancer prevention and brain enhancer)
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice (vitamin-C )
  • Bragg’s Liquid Aminos™

Process the cilantro, parsley, flax seed oil and coconut oil in a blender until finely chopped.

Add the garlic, nuts, and seeds, turmeric and lemon juice and mix until the mixture is finely blended into a puree paste.

Add a dash of Bragg’s Liquid Aminos to taste and blend again.

Store in dark glass jars.

This pesto freezes well, so purchase cilantro in season and fill enough jars to last through the year. You can also freeze in ice trays, pop out like ice cubes and store in freezer bags.

Health Disclaimer

All information in this post is provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate health professionals and conduct their own independent research on any matter relating to their health and well-being.

The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based on the best judgment and research available to the authors at this time, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries.

June 5, 2012

How Healthy is the Egg; Free Range ?

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Real Free Range Chickens:

 There has been and will undoubtedly continue to be much discussion about the egg.  No, I do not mean “which came first, the chicken or the egg!” I just want to talk about the egg not the chicken.

You ask, “how healthy is a free range, cage free egg? First, you must understand what the terms mean and how you can be hoodwinked by the grocery stores and end up paying more for what you thought you understood free range and cage free to mean.

The Egg cartons in the grocery stores that have the word “cagefree or cage free” means the chickens were not in a cage. However, they ARE in a building shielded from the sun and obtaining necessary vitamin-D for health. When you have a lot of chickens in a confined space, a lot of dropping become accumulated and the chickens are not human, so they walk, run, fall and even lay their eggs wherever.

Cagefree, You decide!

 

Free range chickens are free to roam the fields and live in a more natural state. Generally, the accumulation of droppings is more spread out therefore, the potential to lay the egg in the droppings is greatly reduced. That is not to say it may not happen, but it is less likely.

When chickens are either in cages or in restricted buildings, the potential for disease transmission is also increased because of the close quarters and increased concentration of droppings (litter treatment options are available).  Also, remember the egg shells are porous and will absorb liquids and lots of other things making them unhealthy.

Chickens that are free range and cage free are in the sun and just like humans, they adsorb vitamin-D. The overall health benefit of vitamin-D is another blog (see short video below), but I am sure you have some idea of the benefits; bones, immune system, mood, weight etc.  Well, if the chicken is in better health, the egg produced by the chicken is a healthier egg.

Compare a store bought, 30+ days old egg before it gets to the store to a free range egg.

I am fortunate enough to be able to get my free range eggs from a friend who breeds all kinds of fowl and treats them like her children.  She has even named them all and can tell you their personalities.  Currently, she has over twenty-five (25) different types of eggs I can get; chicken, quail, duck, geese, turkey and pheasant is what I can remember right now. They come is all shapes, colors, sizes and textures.

If you want to breed your own free range chickens, here are some tips she told me about to get your fowl to produce the healthiest eggs:

  1. keep them happy,
  2. do not debeak them,
  3. let them be free range in a natural field,
  4. make them nesting boxes,
  5. feed them scrap + oyster shell + the egg laying pellets and no growth hormones,
  6. give them minerals and vitamins to replace minerals and vitamins lost during the laying season, yes, when they are left to nature taking its course, they have a season and it is not always year round although some may choose to do so,
  7. feed them rice sauteed with grape seed oil + fresh vegetables,
  8. in the winter – add cayenne to their feed to keep them warm and bug free,
  9. in the summer – add garlic powder to their feed to keep them bug free,
  10. talk to them,
  11. thank them for the egg they let you take.

In the end,  the egg you get will the following nutritional values and health benefits:

  1. a deep vibrant yellow-orange firmer creamier yolk that looks like the sun and is high in beta carotene (vitamin-A),
  2. 6 times the vitamin-D as factory store bought eggs,
  3. 4 times the vitamin-E as factory store bought eggs,
  4. 33% less cholesterol as factory store bought eggs,
  5. 25% less saturated fat as factory store bought eggs,
  6. 2 times the omega-3 as factory store bought eggs,
  7. 2 eggs virtually satisfy the RDV of vitamin-D,
  8. does not have any more calories, but 3 times the nutritional value as factory store bought eggs,

Just like humans, fowls “are what they eat”. Food, sun (vitamin-D) and exercise plays a major  role here also. The varied diet  and open air and sun promotes better nutrition for the chicken as well as the egg produced.  As explained in the video above vitamin-D is critical to being healthy.  Apply what is said in the video to fowl.

Additional health promoting benefits of eating free range and cage free eggs are:

  1. better hair,
  2. better nails,
  3. better brain function – omega-3,
  4. better for your heart – omega-3,
  5. better immune system because you are getting local, within your environment,
  6. reduces inflammation,
  7. promotes weight loss,
  8. prevents blood clots,
  9. protects eyes from degeneration,
  10. may prevent breast cancer,
  11. less chances of salmonella.

Open Range Eggs:

 

There is probably more that could be added, but this is all I know. That being said, may I suggest you seek to find a local hatchery that is free range and start getting your eggs. Yes, they are more expensive than the store bought eggs to purchase, but it’s like using “food as preventative medicine”.  Take into consideration what went into taking care of the particular fowl to make sure you are getting a quality product. Therefore, in the long run, it’s cheaper, you are healthier and you will be supporting a local sustainable farmer and his/her family.

Nutrition Consultations Available: Choices N* Nutrition

RECIPES:

Healthy Egg Recipes

101 Cookbooks

Preserving Eggs for the Long Term

REFERENCES:

Nutrition In Eggs WHFoods.com

Nutritional Foods for the Body Mind and Soul

Egg Handling 101

Organic Eggs vs Free Range or Cage Free and Alternatives

WebMD Are Some Eggs Safer Than Others?

Medicine.net: Nutritionists Take a Look at Eggs

Eat Wild.com: Health Benefits of Grass-Fed Products

LiveStrong.com: Health Benefits of Eggs

Shape.com: Ask the Diet Doctor

 

Health Disclaimer http://www.MamaVega.com and http://www.HealthyNeverTastedSoGood.com

All information in this article is provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate health professionals and conduct their own independent research on any matter relating to their health and well-being.

The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based on the best judgment and research available to the authors at this time, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries.

June 3, 2012

How to Reduce HBP with Fresh Fish

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http://www.fatsoflife.com/images/Omega3_in_fish.gif

Earlier today I received a text from a friend wanting to know if I knew where she could get bonito fish because she was told it would help her with her high blood pressure (HBP). I told her I was not sure, perhaps in one of the Asian Markets because I understood it to be a fish used a lot in Japan.  However, I cautioned her that if this fish was from the waters in Japan and she should be cautious. Apparently, there have been blue fin tuna fish migrating to the shores of California from the waters off Japan with ten (10) times the normal radioactivity level as a result of the Fukushima Diaichii Nuclear Reactor Incident last year.  The reason the bonito fish is used for HBP is because of its DHA Omega-3 (310 mg).  However, there are other fish with higher levels of DHA Omega-3.   Just like we have seasonal produce, fish are seasonal as well and the nutritional value is better at different times of the year.  Additionally, there are some fish within the same species that would have more of a given nutrient than others. Usually the price in the store is an indicator of a higher nutritional value concentration. After a bit of research, I was able to gather the information that follows: The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, and salmon) at least 2 times a week.

Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.  Several clinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids lower blood pressure in people with hypertension.

Fish oilhas been shown to lower levels of triglycerides (fats in the blood), and to lower the risk of death, heart attack (and HBP), stroke, and abnormal heart rhythms in people who have already had a heart attack. Fish oil also appears to help prevent and treat atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) by slowing the development of plaque and blood clots, which can clog arteries.

Deep frying fatty fish is the way to protect  DHA Omega-3 oils  from leaking out because the protein of egg and flour can become barriers to prevent outflow of these oils.. Instead of deep frying, try baking with some form of a coating to seal in the Omega-3.

Tuna Fish at Monterey Bay Aquarium

Tuna Fish – Click for Nutritional

Although the blue fin tuna off the coast of California has been determined to be radioactive (supposedly this 10 times the norm is no problem), fishermen in Gloucester, MA catch them off the Atlantic Ocean. Tuna season is approximately from April through November. However in Louisiana off the Gulf Coast, tuna is fished year round. Fresh tuna fish has the highest DHA Omega-3 of fish (2880 mg/serving).   http://www.tunahunter.com/

Salmon Fish © B. Guild Gillespie/www.chartingnature.com Salmon – Click the fish for nutritional information.

Salmon season is from May – Sept, Oct, or Nov depending on the boundaries (Oregon/CA, US/Mexico-Monterey, San Francisco). It has the third highest DHA Omega-3 (820 mg /serving).

Wild Alaska salmon is a high-quality source of protein and vitamins – including D, B6, B12 and selenium –as well as an excellent source for the omega-3 fatty acids that support brain and heart health.

“The abundance forecast of Sacramento River fall Chinook in 2012 is 819,400, far above the number needed for optimum spawning this fall (122,000-180,000 fish),” according to the PFMC. “The Klamath River fall Chinook forecast for 2012 is about four times greater than average and the highest forecast on record since 1985.”

Read more: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/articles/fishing-115216-coast-county.html#ixzz1wIo1XaUb

  •  King (Chinook) – Alaska’s largest salmon fish species, king salmon are prized for the high oil content that make this firm fish exceptionally flavorful

  •     Sockeye (Red) – Alaska’s second-most abundant fish species is known for its distinctive red meat color and full flavor
  •     Coho (Silver) – Alaska’s second-largest salmon species is low in saturated fat and mild in flavor
  •     Keta (Chum) – The firmest of Alaska’s salmon species, keta salmon have a lower oil content and mild flavor, perfect for cooking at gentler temperatures.
  •     Pink – The most abundant and affordable of Alaska’s salmon species is commonly seen in cans and pouches, but is also increasingly available in fish fillets

Visit Wild Alaska Flavor for dozens of healthy, delicious recipes as well as ideas for easy and affordable ways to enjoy wild Alaska salmon at home.

Recipe: Panko Crusted Salmon Croquettes

 

Mackerel Fish

Mackerel – Click for Nutritional

After having a difficult time finding mackerel here in central California, I finally discovered its season is December through February and is abundant on the east coast. However, I was able to find it in the can. Mackerel has the second highest DHA Omega-3 (1780 mg/serving).

 

Bonito

According to Wikipedia, Bonito is a name given to various species of medium-sized, predatory fish in the Scombridae family. Bonito can be found in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. In Japanese cuisine, bonito refers to the skipjack tuna (a species of mackerel) . The bonito has a moderate fat content whereas the previously mentioned fish have a much higher fat content resulting in a higher DHA Omega 3 (319 mg/serving.

I should mention sardines have 1140 mg/serving of DHA Omega-3.  These little tikes pack a powerful punch so do not overlook them in your diet.

Links to federal salt water fish regulation on fish http://www.scottsbt.com/fishids/regsrecs/regsFED.htm

Food Recipes (Fish):

Fresh Tuna Recipes                                                                   Fresh Mackerel Recipes

Fresh Salmon Recipes                                                              Fresh Bonito Recipes

Omega-3 DHA and Omega-3 EPA are largely derived from fish oils, with ...

 

Fats account for over 50% of the brain and Omega-3 DHA represents 30% of brain matter.  The highest concentration of Omega-3 DHA in the human body is in the retina. Therefore, fish is definitely a food everyone should have in their diet to maintain brain power and eye sight.

Omega-3 DHA is an essential component of breast milk, and newborn babies utilise Omega-3 DHA for brain, nerve and eye tissue development.

Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Pocket Guide

Finally, in my quest to garner this information, I discovered that although the Mackerel fish is seasonal, it can be ordered in some meat/fish departments here in California because it is considered a throw away fish and used for bait. The general cost is on $1.99 per pound fresh.  After checking the isles where tuna is kept, I found 15 oz cans of mackerel for $1.89 in water and salt. In this economy, this is definitely better pricing than salmon or tuna to get the same Omega-3 benefits.

It may take a bit of looking, but you can eat healthy and economically. Healthy Never Tasted So Good!

Health Disclaimer http://www.mamavega.com and http://www.mamavega.com/blog

All information in this article is provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate health professionals and conduct their own independent research on any matter relating to their health and well-being.

The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based on the best judgment and research available to the authors at this time, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries.

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